Welcome to the blog for To The Moon Clothing - the only brand fully committed to merging cool street wear with astronomy and space themes.

Included here are stories, features, designs, facts and anything space related!

One of our custom Stars & Shield tees that was sent out the other day. Worth the wait as this tee is fully unique with every one made. Each one is made to order and goes through a 2 step dye and paint process. #becausewecare #limitededition #oneoff 
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#astronaut #apollo #astronomy #cosmos #custom #dye #acidwash #stars #shield #badge #logo #moon #space #nasa #nebula

One of our custom Stars & Shield tees that was sent out the other day. Worth the wait as this tee is fully unique with every one made. Each one is made to order and goes through a 2 step dye and paint process. #becausewecare #limitededition #oneoff
www.ttmclothing.co.uk
#astronaut #apollo #astronomy #cosmos #custom #dye #acidwash #stars #shield #badge #logo #moon #space #nasa #nebula

One of our custom Stars & Shield tees that was sent out the other day. Worth the wait as this tee is fully unique with every one made. Each one is made to order and goes through a 2 step dye and paint process. #becausewecare #limitededition #oneoff 
www.ttmclothing.co.uk
#astronaut #apollo #astronomy #cosmos #custom #dye #acidwash #stars #shield #badge #logo #moon #space #nasa #nebula

One of our custom Stars & Shield tees that was sent out the other day. Worth the wait as this tee is fully unique with every one made. Each one is made to order and goes through a 2 step dye and paint process. #becausewecare #limitededition #oneoff
www.ttmclothing.co.uk
#astronaut #apollo #astronomy #cosmos #custom #dye #acidwash #stars #shield #badge #logo #moon #space #nasa #nebula

A few images of tonight’s #supermoon we managed to snap with nothing but a basic telescope and humble iPhone camera! 

Join us in spreading a passion for space & astronomy by tagging #thespacemovement & #ttmclothing 

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#astronomy #space #nasa #nightsky #moon #lunar #astrophotography #fortheloveofspace

A few images of tonight’s #supermoon we managed to snap with nothing but a basic telescope and humble iPhone camera!

Join us in spreading a passion for space & astronomy by tagging #thespacemovement & #ttmclothing

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#astronomy #space #nasa #nightsky #moon #lunar #astrophotography #fortheloveofspace

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Tonight will play host to the last of 2014’s Supermoons - and it is looking likely to be a good one.

As was described in our previous posts regarding the natural phenomenon, a supermoon occurs when the moon is full and at what is known as its perigee - the time in its orbit when the moon travels closest round the Earth. When in perigee, the moon is just 360,000km away from Earth and approximately 50,000km closer than when it is at the furthest point from earth - in its apogee.

Although not quite as close to the Earth as the August 10th supermoon, tonight’s still promises to impress as generally clear skies are expected across the country *fingers crossed*.

We recommend you make the most of this event, and take just 30 seconds out of your night to go and view this natural event. After all, although fairly frequent, the next supermoon will not be for another year, in September 2015!

For best results, view the supermoon just after it rises or before it sets, when it is close to the horizon. If you watch as it dips behind buildings or trees, an optical illusion is produced, which makes the moon seem even larger than it really is.

The moon will rise above the horizon tonight at 19.38 GMT so look out for it as soon as possible after this time to catch it nearer Earth, therefore bigger and brighter!

Feel free to share & tag your supermoon pictures with #thespacemovement and #ttmclothing


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So we had to go check out this amazing piece of art! Seen is our super comfy Logo Sweater in a heathered navy cotton/poly blend. Also available in the reverse: heathered grey and navy ink! Go check it out and our other sweater online. 
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#angelsandairwaves #astronaut #astronomy #earth #fortheloveofspace #galaxy #graffiti #inspire #moon #nasa #london #fashion #streetwear #space #skatewear #tothemoon #ttmclothing #thespacemovement

So we had to go check out this amazing piece of art! Seen is our super comfy Logo Sweater in a heathered navy cotton/poly blend. Also available in the reverse: heathered grey and navy ink! Go check it out and our other sweater online.
www.ttmclothing.co.uk
#angelsandairwaves #astronaut #astronomy #earth #fortheloveofspace #galaxy #graffiti #inspire #moon #nasa #london #fashion #streetwear #space #skatewear #tothemoon #ttmclothing #thespacemovement

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We have an excellent way for you to keep up-to-date with all the latest NASA news, headlines and images, and all from the comfort of your mobile device!

As you may be aware, a few months ago we provided you guys with a superb way of keeping up with what we are getting up to here at To The Moon.

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Using the application ‘If This Then That’ (IFTTT) you can get phone notifications for when we post on social media platforms Twitter, Instagram or Tumblr. This is especially handy if you are a promoter, as it lets you know exactly when and what you can promote! Here’s a link to get set up for our notifications in case you missed it.

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But now things have gotten even better! The guys at IFTTT have introduced a whole ‘Outer Space’ section that ensures you never miss an ISS passover or Nasa APOD (Astronomy Picture of the Day)!

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To enable this follow these steps:

1. Go to your app store and download IFTT for free.

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2. Open the application and swipe across to the right on the top bar until you are able to press ‘Browse Recipes’

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3.There is a collection of themed recipes - one of the first of which should be the ‘Outer Space’ collection. Simply click on this and enjoy browsing the notification possibilities!

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We may have been away for a while travelling, but we’re back to deliver the awesome news that NASA have committed to plans to build the most powerful rocket the world has ever seen!

The bold and exciting vision, bolsters plans to get man to Mars in the 2030’s; a seemingly hopeful target now just made much more real with the plan to invest $7 billion into the new rocket.

The program known as the Space Launch System (SPS) program, is now set for development and seems deemed to be the first large scale development of an exploration class vehicle since the space shuttle.

Plans are to have the 70 metric ton vehicle ready for its first SLS flight no later than 2018.

NASA Associate Administrator Robert Lightfoot stated:

"Our nation is embarked on an ambitious space exploration program, and we owe it to the American taxpayers to get it right. After rigorous review, we’re committing today to a funding level and readiness date that will keep us on track to sending humans to Mars in the 2030s – and we’re going to stand behind that commitment."

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Tonight’s second spectacle - The Perseids

As well as tonight’s supermoon, information for which can be found here, the skies will be boasting the magnificent Perseids meteor shower.

The Perseids have the title ‘Fireball Champion’ for their very active nature and meteors often as bright as Venus or Jupiter. The 2014 Perseid meteor shower will most likely peak on the mornings of August 11, 12 and 13, however, you still stand a good chance of seeing some tonight too.

How To View

The meteors can be viewed at early-evening in some cases. Although between early-evening and nightfall the meteors tend to be few-and-far-between, it is at this time only, that you can see one of the Perseid’s rarest treats - an earthgrazer. An Earthgrazer is a long slow meteor that travels horizontally across the sky. They can only appear at early to mid-evening, when the radiant point of the shower is close to the horizon.

After this, the best time to view the meteor shower is late into the night. As it gets later the meteor shower radiant climbs higher in the sky and more Perseid meteors streak the sky. Find a good dark spot to observe from with as little light pollution as possible. Also give yourself plenty of observing time. Firstly, it takes our eyes approximately 20-30 minutes to fully adjust to the night sky, and secondly these meteors come in spurts and are interspersed with lulls in activity.

It is best looking at an area of sky 20 to 30 degrees away from the Perseid radiant – the spot near the constellation of Perseus that the meteors appear to fly out from.

Tonights supermoon can affect the viewing of the Perseids. Thankfully, at this time of year the moon is quite close to the horizon which leaves much of the sky dark. However, the brighter glare that the supermoon gives off may make seeing the fainter meteors more difficult to see. To minimise the affect the supermoon may have on viewing the Perseids it is best to have your back to the supermoon and/or to
keep the moon hidden behind trees/buildings.

Every 133 years, comet Swift-Tuttle swings through the inner Solar System and leaves behind a trail of gas and dust. When the Earth passes through, the particles from this dust cloud hit the atmosphere at 140,000 mph and burn up in streaking flashes of light.

The best days to see the meteors is between Saturday and Wednesday, with activity peaking on Tuesday. After which the activity of the shower falls off rapidly.

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Join us in growing a space-loving social community. Like-minded space fanatics sharing images and supporting each other! It’s not about the number of followers or likes - it’s about celebrating our shared interests! Join us with #thespacemovement | www.ttmclothing.co.uk | 
#astronaut #astronomy #astrophotography #cosmos #earth #support #supermoon #moon #tothemoon #thespacemovement #ttmclothing #fortheloveofspace #galaxy #gravity #inspire #instascience #cooperation #space #nasa

Join us in growing a space-loving social community. Like-minded space fanatics sharing images and supporting each other! It’s not about the number of followers or likes - it’s about celebrating our shared interests! Join us with #thespacemovement | www.ttmclothing.co.uk |
#astronaut #astronomy #astrophotography #cosmos #earth #support #supermoon #moon #tothemoon #thespacemovement #ttmclothing #fortheloveofspace #galaxy #gravity #inspire #instascience #cooperation #space #nasa

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Supermoon tonight - 30% brighter and 14% bigger

So tonight (weather permitting) will boast a gorgeous Super Moon. The moon will be closer to the Earth than it has been in 20 years, and so we can enjoy a moon that will be 14% bigger and 30% brighter than usual.

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Super moons occur on average every 13 months. However, as this summer boasts 3 in close succession, the same is not expected to happen again until 2034. The supermoon should reach its full perigee (when its orbit brings it closest to Earth) at 6.10pm. Make sure to go check it out as it will be closest and brightest for only 26 minutes as its orbit takes it to within 221,765 miles of Earth.

With the moon being so close to the earth it will have an impact on Britain’s coast. Spring tides are expected and this will see those that live on the coast experiencing higher tides than normal for this time of year. However, no tidal damage is expected with the rare event.

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Where is the best place to see the supermoon?

Northern Scotland is expected to enjoy the best view of the supermoon as this is where the moon will appear lowest on the horizon in Britain. However, with the Perseid Meteor shower also filling tonight’s sky, whatever the weather be sure to brave the outdoors tonight!

We will be giving more information on how best to make the most of the Perseid meteor shower later so be sure to check back!

Dates for future supermoons

10 August, 2014

9 September, 2014

28 September, 2015

14 November, 2016

2 January, 2018

As usual, if you enjoyed this blog or found it useful/interesting please like and re-blog!

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After a decade long chase, European space probe Rosetta has almost caught up with Comet 67P

The small probe is due to rendezvous with the comet tomorrow morning, Wednesday 06/08/14. The probe will come within 100km of its target, the unusual comet 6,7P, where it will then try to enter into an orbit around the comet. It will orbit for a year using its 11 instruments to study unprecedented information about the comet’s structure and composition.

Launched back in 2004, the probe has been on a huge voyage, orbiting the sun five times and using the gravity of Earth and Mars to accelerate to catch up with 67P. During the most distant and coldest stretch of its journey, Rosetta was put into a hibernation for more than two years to save on power. Its successful re-awakening last January was met with a large sigh of relief from those involved with the probe.

Entering an orbit round the comet will not be easy as it hurtles through space at 55kmp/h (34,000mph). Further complications arise too as engineers working out the orbit will have to take into account the comet’s unusual shape. To make the task yet more difficult, intricate pre-planning and pre-manoeuvring has to be figured out because radio signals take more than 22 minutes to travel between Earth and the spacecraft.

Difficulties aside, If all goes well, mission managers will then attempt to pick a spot for touch down on the comet some point in November - a first ever in space exploration.

Prof Monica Grady of the Open University, who designed and built an instrument for the lander, is keen to see if the comet’s water, locked in the form of ice, bears any relation to water found on Earth, and to understand more about its chemical composition.

"The biggest question that we are trying to get an answer to is: where did life on Earth come from?

"How did life get going? Was it the building blocks of life that were brought to us from comets or did it get going on Earth? Did the water on Earth come from comets? Are we reliant on these bodies to have brought water to us?"

To reveal some answers, scientists will measure the ratio of hydrogen and deuterium in the comet’s ice to provide a comparison with water on Earth.

Researchers also want to see if the comet contains amino acids, molecules that are essential ingredients for DNA. One theory being that comets were crucial for delivering water, carbon and other essential building-blocks for life to the early Earth. The results could have incredibly important implications to our understanding of our early solar system and of how life may have formed on the early Earth.

Confirmation of Rosetta’s rendezvous with 67P - the start of its extraordinary trek alongside the comet - should come by 11:35 CEST (10:35 BST) on Wednesday.

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#FactOfTheDay

Our Sun is almost 1 million miles in diameter. Pretty large right? From 93 million miles away we still feel it’s warm glow and feast off of its rays. It supports all of the life that we know of and it could fit Earth inside it 1million times.

Big right?… Wrong!

Though huge to us and the planets in our Solar System, our star is in fact pretty puny. Take the star Eta Carinae, found 7,500 light years from Earth for example. This supergiant is 5 million times larger than our Sun.

The leap to the largest star we know of (currently) really makes our Sun feel insignificant. VY Canis Majoris is a red hypergiant star found 3,900 light years away in the Canis Major constellation. This giant is 1 billion times bigger than our Sun with a diameter of 1,975,000,000 kilometres!

We realise that these are just numbers. It’s difficult to understand just how ridiculously big this is. So please kick back and let the video explain!

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NASA’s new Martian Rover to be able to create Oxygen

NASA have stated their new rover, which is scheduled to land on the red planet in 2021, will have a device that is capable of turning the CO2, which dominates the thin Martian air, in to Oxygen.

This technology could support human life or make rocket fuel for return missions. Being able to produce oxygen could help since transporting fuel is heavy and expensive. Some Nasa spacecraft can already produce oxygen from CO2. However, the rover’s new “MOXIE” device will test this capability in the Martian atmosphere, for the first time.

The new rover is modelled on Curiosity, the rover which successfully landed on the red planet on August of 2012 and has been exploring the Martian surface and sending back important geological data and findings.

The new rover has a much stripped down payload, with less scientific equipment. Curiosity, the current Martian rover, had a scientific payload weighing 75kg. It’s new 2020 brother, however, will have a scientific payload of just 40kg. 

Prof Tom Pike from Imperial College, London, the co-investigator of the “MOXIE” instrument stated the new rover is a ‘shift in gears.’

"It is very much about the old Star Trek ‘boldly going’, the real focus of this payload is exploration rather than science," he explained.

The Curiosity MKII will weigh one-tonne, cost $1.9bn (£1.12bn) have ground-penetrating radar for analysing the planet’s geology, two arm-mounted gadgets for analysing the chemistry and structure of soil and rocks, and two cameras.

In an exciting first, the two cameras are designed so that in a particular configuration they will be able to record 3D movies.

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Sitting among the hangars and laboratories of NASA’s Ames Research Center is McMoon’s; a hacker’s headquarters, converted from an old McDonald’s. Gone are the fast-food counters and dining tables and in are the old tape drives and modern computers. The self-described techno-archaeologists who call this their office have been on a mission to recover and digitize forgotten photos taken in the ’60s by a quintet of scuttled lunar satellites.

"We’re reaching back to a capability that existed but couldn’t be touched back when it was created," says Keith Cowing, co-lead and founding member at LOIRP (Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project). "It’s like having a DVD in 1966, you can’t play it. We had resolution of the Earth of about a kilometer [per pixel].

Taking old data caught on 1500 analog data tapes the team has brought back some 2,000 pictures. They contain the first high-resolution photographs ever taken from behind the lunar horizon, including the first photo of an earthrise. Thanks to the technical savvy and DIY engineering of the team at LOIRP, it’s now being seen at a higher resolution than was ever previously possible.

Between 1966 and ‘67, five Lunar Orbiters snapped pictures onto 70mm film from about 30 miles above the moon. The satellites were sent mainly to scout potential landing sites for manned moon missions.The images were beamed in modulated signals to one of three receiving stations in Australia, Spain, or California, where the pictures were recorded straight to tape. After this the five orbiters were rather unceremoniously laid to rest amongst the moon rocks.

But now, decades later, the LOIRP team have tracked down these data tapes and tirelessly pulled the stunning data captured within them. Much of this data even surpasses today’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter’s resolution.

"A lot of the images they’re taking today, our imagery from 1966 and ‘67 has sometimes greater resolution and greater dynamic range because of the way the pictures were taken. So sometimes you look into a shadow in a picture that LRO’s taken, and you don’t see any detail — with ours, you do."

After proving that their work with the LOIRP project was providing very useful results, NASA agreed to fund the rogue team and has done since 2008, before which the project was funded entirely from the hackers own pockets.

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Check out the LOIRP team’s results in the mini gallery below.

Earthrise as seen by Lunar Orbiter 1 1966

Tsiolkovskiy, a large impact crater located on the far side of the Moon as seen by Lunar Orbiter 3 1967

Medium resolution image taken by Lunar Orbiter 3 1967

Crater Copernicus as seen by Lunar Orbiter 2 1966

Straight shot of the Lunar surface taken by Lunar Orbiter 2 1966

The moon’s far side taken by Lunar Orbiter 2 1966

Second earthrise image with the Moon’s far side surface and the Sea of Tsiolkovsky prominently featured.

A closeup of Tsiolkovskiy impact crater

Lunar Orbiter 4 photograph showing a crescent Earth and partly illuminated Moon.

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jtotheizzoe:

I think of all the -ographies, “selenography” is my favorite.

Enjoy these historical atlases of the moon, the earliest studies of the moon’s surface features (AKA “selenography”). The above were drawn by:

  • Michel van Langren (1645)
  • Johannes Hevelius (1647)
  • Giovanni Cassini (1679)
  • Tobias Mayer (1749)
  • Richard Andree (1881)
  • Henry White Warren (1879)

Previously: Check out Galileo’s watercolor illustrations of the moon, and find out how a few simple sketches realigned the heavens.

(via the-actual-universe)

Source: jtotheizzoe